(Index as of March 2018, 1:1 through 6:1)

AUTHOR INDEX

(NOTE: multiple articles by the same author are indexed chronologically)

Anderson, Victor.  “Improving Spiritual Formation in Expository Preaching by Using Cognitive Moral Development Theory,” JEHS 1:1, December 2001.

Abstract: In light of the realization that preaching has failed to be optimally effective in inducing Christian spiritual formation, this paper suggests how homileticians seeking to increase the transformative effectiveness of their expository sermons may utilize selected components of Lawrence Kohlberg’s theory of Cognitive Moral Development (CMD). After briefly orienting readers to Kohlberg’s construct, the paper seeks to show how CMD theory may be utilized effectively in three areas: (1) clarifying transformation as the goal of expository preaching; (2) improving audience analysis; and (3) designing sermons to induce transitions to higher stages of moral reasoning.

 

Arthurs, Jeffrey D. “The Place of Pathos in Preaching,” JEHS 1:1, December 2001.

Abstract: Preaching that addresses the emotions along with the mind is more effective than preaching which speaks only to the mind. This truth seems self-evident, yet pathos receives little attention in homiletics texts. This paper explores why pathos is vital in preaching and suggests ways to upgrade our use of pathos.

Arthurs, Jeffrey D. “Survey of Honoraria Of the Members of the Evangelical Homiletical Society,” JEHS 2:2, December 2002.

Arthurs, Jeffrey. “Tribute to Keith Willhite: Friend, Partner, and Mentor.” JEHS 3:1, June 2003.

Arthurs, Jeffrey D.  “Short Sentences Long Remembered: Preaching Genre-Sensitive Sermons from Proverbs.”  JEHS 5:1, March 2005.

Bailey, Mark. “Keith Willhite Memorial A Tribute Delivered at the Funeral Saturday 19 April 2003.”  JEHS 3:1, June 2003. JEHS 3:1, June 2003.

Barton, Casey C. “Building a Bridge or Widening the Divide? A Critique of the “Two-World” Paradigm in Mark Ellingsen and Charles Campbell.”  JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

Bender, Kelly L. “What Is The New Homiletic?” JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

Chapell, Bryan. “To Make God Come Down,” (sermon on Luke 17:1-17), JEHS 1:1 December 2001.

Chapell, Bryan.  ” Preaching His Story: Narrative Paths, Problems and Promise.” JEHS 6:1, March 2006.

Chapell, Bryan. “The Story of the Gospel Applied to Exposition.” JEHS 6:1, March 2006.

Currie, David A. and Susan P Currie.  “Preaching As Lectio Divina: An Evangelical and Expository Approach.”  JEHS 4:1, March 2004.

Abstract: Drawing from the perspectives of both a preacher and a spiritual director, this paper will argue that preaching should model multiple ways for people to hear God speak through Scripture, tapping the collective wisdom of the whole church, particularly the contemplative tradition. The authors will suggest three primary ways of incorporating lectio divina into expository preaching. Prospectively, as a means of allowing God to speak to the preacher more intuitively before employing the classic historical/grammatical interpretive method of sermon preparation, which can then test and reshape the intuitive insights for preaching. Introspectively, as a means of developing occasional first-person sermons that model a Loyolan approach to lectio divina, in which the imagination places one in a narrative and explores how a Biblical character experienced God at work, and retrospectively, as a means of applying exegetical insights from the sermon through post sermon reflection questions facilitating an ongoing listening/response to God.

Gibson, Scott M. “A Tribute: Keith Willhite.” JEHS 3:1, June 2003. JEHS 3:1, June 2003.

Gibson, Scott M.  “Defining the New Homiletic.”  JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

Grounds, Vernon. “Some Reflections on Pulpit Rhetoric,” JEHS 1:1 December 2001.

Hartley, Brian T. “Worship and Preaching in a Technological Society: A History of the Word through an “Ongian” Lens.” JEHS 5:1, March 2005.

Abstract:  Using a model articulated by Walter Ong, this essay suggests that technology has shaped worship and preaching through three stages of history—oral, typographic, and, now, an electronic culture. Each perceives “the word” differently, and reminds us, in the words of Marshall McLuhan, that “the medium is the message.”

Kaiser, Walter C., Jr. “The Modern Aversion from Authorial Intentionality and from “Making Points” in a Sermon.” JEHS 4:2, September 2004.

Abstract: The meaning of the text is obscured when preachers do not take into consideration the meaning the author intended. This article explores the homiletical implications of experience over authorial intent.

Keller, Dale.  “If the Medium is the Message: How is the Preacher to Preach the Sermon?” JEHS 5:1, March 2005.

Abstract: Oftentimes in homiletic endeavors, techniques of the message construction and delivery take precedence. While not denying that importance, this paper considers another aspect by probing the relationship of preacher to God. The author contends the God-human relationship must take precedence.

Lovejoy, Grant.  “But I Did Such a Great Exposition: Literate Preachers Confront Orality,” JEHS 1:1, December 2001.

Abstract: Exposition uses ways of knowing, thinking, and expression that are second nature to highly literate people. But exposition is difficult for oral communicators to understand, remember, and share with others. Oral communication preferences predominate in the world, yet homiletics gives that fact scant attention.

McClellan, Dave. “Recovering a Sense of Orality in Homiletics.”  JEHS 6:1, March 2006.

Abstract:  The newer trend in homiletics toward spontaneity is actually very old, going back to the days of primary orality, before literacy had established dominance in the communicative arena. Resources from the pre-modern world of orality (including metaphor, grounding in struggle, repetition, narrative structuring, classical invention, and dialogue) can serve to make the sermon a truly oral event even informing a post-modern homiletic setting.

McDill, Wayne. “Low-Tech Preaching in a High-Tech Age.”  JEHS 6:1, March 2006.

Abstract:  The current trend toward the use of audio-visual aids and drama in preaching may reveal an underlying lack of confidence in preaching in its essential form. The premise of this paper is that there is no form of communication more dynamic and effective than direct oral communication by a passionate preacher.

Pelton, Randall and Carroll, Jeff. “If You Can’t Spiritualize, Allegorize, or Moralize, What’s a Preacher to Do? Preaching Christ From Gospel Narratives.” JEHS 5:1, March 2005.

Abstract:  Of all the genres, preaching Christ should be the easiest in the Gospels. Unlike Old Testament narratives where Jesus is hard to find, the Gospels are sermonic history writing whose main character is Jesus. 1 The Gospel records are intended to make theological statements about Jesus, yet many sermons from the Gospels revolve around non-Christ-centered themes. What is a preacher to do?

Platinga, Cornelius, Jr. “Dancing the Edge of Mystery: The new homiletics celebrates pilgrimage, not propositions.”  JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

Radford, Shawn D. “The New Homiletic within Non-Christendom.”  JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

Abstract:  Fred B. Craddock elevated the roles of the listeners in the preaching event, giving birth to the New Homiletic. Nevertheless, Craddock’s understanding of the roles of the listeners has inherent benefits and risks for preaching. As non-Christendom becomes a more prominent cultural milieu for listeners in the United States, the benefits of the New Homiletic decrease as the risks increase. Accordingly, Craddock’s understanding of the roles of the listeners will need to be modified in non-Christendom so that the listeners are more likely to hear the voice of God and become mature Christ followers.

Ralston, Timothy J. “Back to the Future”: Classical Categories of Exegesis, Application and Authority for Preaching and Spiritual Formation.”  JEHS 3:2, December 2003.

Abstract: A recovery of the ancient categories of lectio continua (lectio semi-continua), lectio selecta and lectio divina provide a helpful taxonomy to understand (a) the hermeneutic approach to the Biblical text by the preacher, (b) the relative authority of the message preached and (c) the corresponding role of the application made within the sermon for the spiritual formation of individuals and Christian communities.

Reed, John W. “Reflections on a Life Well Lived” [Keith Willhite tribute]. JEHS 3:1, June 2003.

Robinson, Haddon W. “Keith Willhite: A Tribute.”  JEHS 3:1, June 2003.

Scharf, Greg R.  “The Spirituality of Jesus as Seen in John 14:10: An Example for Preachers.” JEHS 4:1, March 2004.

Schultze, Quentin J. “Technique Over Virtue: The New Context For Communication In The Information Age,” JEHS 2:1, June 2002.

Shaw, Wayne E. “Reflections on Homiletical Balance and Boundaries for Evangelicals,” JEHS 2:1, June 2002.

Sheard, Daniel.  “Preaching in the Hear and Now: The Circumstantial Quality of the Preaching Engagement.”  JEHS 4:2, September 2004.

Abstract:  Looking at the oral nature of preaching, the author probes the ramifications of defining the sermon as a circumstantial meeting of the preacher, the hearers, and their God. When preaching is defined as an interpersonal engagement, delivery objectives turn toward the need to foster relational exchange. Preparatory energies become focused toward emotional capture in the immediate, and the message ultimately becomes a localized encounter in the hear and now.

Smith, Kenneth W. “Preaching the Psalms with Respect for Their Inspired Design.”  JEHS 3:2, December 2003.

Abstract: Under the Holy Spirit’s inspiration, the psalmists wrote with poetic power and artifice. The Psalms impact hearers more deeply in part because of the literary devices that the psalmists employ. This paper demonstrates the use of literary devices that may enhance a sermon’s impact on its audience.

Tornfelt, John V. “Preaching The Psalms: Understanding Chiastic Structures for Greater Clarity,” JEHS 2:2, December 2002.

Abstract: Although in ancient Israel psalms were primarily intended to be heard in a linear fashion, a number of psalms also exhibit a secondary chiastic arrangement (a-b-c-b’-a’). This arrangement was not only aesthetically pleasing to the audience but it also provided the psalmist with an opportunity to treat themes twice in a psalm. For example, when a chiastic structure is followed, the unmatched center (a-b-c-b’-a’) is normally the centerpiece of the psalm and where the central truth is found. Moreover, one unit from the first half of the psalm can be considered together with its matching unit in the psalm’s second half in order to more fully understand the theme of the psalmist. By paying attention to chiastic structures, the expositor can preach from the psalms with greater clarity.

Tornfeldt, John V. “Preaching with Authority When You Don’t Have It.”  JEHS 4:2, September 2004.

Warren, Timothy S. “Presence is Persuasive.” JEHS 6:1, March 2006.

Abstract: The mind functions as a vast filing system, storing thousands of images. Some are easily brought to consciousness. Others lie hidden from awareness. An effective preacher seeks to elevate latent images and emotions into the listener’s consciousness. That is the essence of presence, and presence is persuasion. This paper explores how the preacher can create presence.

Willhite, Keith. “Audience Relevance in Expository Preaching.” JEHS 3:1, June 2003.

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SUBJECT INDEX

[for abstracts, see listing in author index]

 Authority in preaching

Tornfeldt, John V. “Preaching with Authority When You Don’t Have It.”  JEHS 4:2, September 2004.

Culture and preaching

Schultze, Quentin J. “Technique Over Virtue: The New Context For Communication In The Information Age,” JEHS 2:1, June 2002. 

Hermeneutics

Homiletics as a profession

Arthurs, Jeffrey D. “Survey of Honoraria Of the Members of the Evangelical Homiletical Society,” JEHS 2:2, December 2002. 

Lectio divina

Currie, David A. and Susan P Currie.  “Preaching As Lectio Divina: An Evangelical and Expository Approach.”  JEHS 4:1, March 2004.

Orality (see, too, sermon delivery)

Hartley, Brian T. “Worship and Preaching in a Technological Society: A History of the Word through an “Ongian” Lens.” JEHS 5:1, March 2005.

Lovejoy, Grant.  “But I Did Such a Great Exposition: Literate Preachers Confront Orality,” JEHS 1:1, December 2001.

McClellan, Dave. “Recovering a Sense of Orality in Homiletics.”  JEHS 6:1, March 2006.

Sheard, Daniel.  “Preaching in the Hear and Now: The Circumstantial Quality of the Preaching Engagement.”  JEHS 4:2, September 2004.

Narrative preaching (see, too, new homiletic)

Chapell, Bryan.  ” Preaching His Story: Narrative Paths, Problems and Promise.”

Chapell, Bryan. “The Story of the Gospel Applied to Exposition.” 

New homiletic (see, too, narrative preaching)

Barton, Casey C. “Building a Bridge or Widening the Divide? A Critique of the “Two-World” Paradigm in Mark Ellingsen and Charles Campbell.”  JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

Bender, Kelly L. “What Is The New Homiletic?” JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

Gibson, Scott M.  “Defining the New Homiletic.”  JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

Platinga, Cornelius, Jr. “Dancing the Edge of Mystery: The new homiletics celebrates pilgrimage, not propositions.”  JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

Radford, Shawn D. “The New Homiletic within Non-Christendom.”  JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

Pastoral ministry and preaching

Anderson, Victor.  “Improving Spiritual Formation in Expository Preaching by Using Cognitive Moral Development Theory,” JEHS 1:1, December 2001.

Ralston, Timothy J. “Back to the Future”: Classical Categories of Exegesis, Application and Authority for Preaching and Spiritual Formation.”  JEHS 3:2, December 2003. 

Preaching the literary forms of the Bible (see, too, orality)

Arthurs, Jeffrey D.  “Short Sentences Long Remembered: Preaching Genre-Sensitive Sermons from Proverbs.”  JEHS 5:1, March 2005.

Pelton, Randall and Carroll, Jeff. “If You Can’t Spiritualize, Allegorize, or Moralize, What’s a Preacher to Do? Preaching Christ From Gospel Narratives.” JEHS 5:1, March 2005.

Smith, Kenneth W. “Preaching the Psalms with Respect for Their Inspired Design.”  JEHS 3:2, December 2003.

Tornfelt, John V. “Preaching The Psalms: Understanding Chiastic Structures for Greater Clarity,” JEHS 2:2, December 2002. 

Rhetoric (see, too, Preaching the Literary Forms of the Bible)

Arthurs, Jeffrey D. “The Place of Pathos in Preaching,” JEHS 1:1, December 2001.

Grounds, Vernon. “Some Reflections on Pulpit Rhetoric,” JEHS 1:1 December 2001.

McClellan, Dave. “Recovering a Sense of Orality in Homiletics.”  JEHS 6:1, March 2006.

Ralston, Timothy J. “Back to the Future”: Classical Categories of Exegesis, Application and Authority for Preaching and Spiritual Formation.”  JEHS 3:2, December 2003.

Sermon delivery  (see, too, orality)

Sheard, Daniel.  “Preaching in the Hear and Now: The Circumstantial Quality of the Preaching Engagement.”  JEHS 4:2, September 2004.

Spirituality and preaching

Keller, Dale.  “If the Medium is the Message: How is the Preacher to Preach the Sermon?” JEHS 5:1, March 2005.

Scharf, Greg R.  “The Spirituality of Jesus as Seen in John 14:10: An Example for Preachers.” JEHS 4:1, March 2004.

Warren, Timothy S. “Presence is Persuasive.” JEHS 6:1, March 2006.

Technology and preaching

McDill, Wayne. “Low-Tech Preaching in a High-Tech Age.”  JEHS 6:1, March 2006. 

Theology and preaching, theology of preaching

Shaw, Wayne E. “Reflections on Homiletical Balance and Boundaries for Evangelicals,” JEHS 2:1, June 2002.

Willhite, Keith. 

Tributes by Jeff Arthurs, Mark Bailey, Scott Gibson, John Reed, Haddon Robinson.  JEHS 3:1, June 2003

 

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SERMON INDEX BY TEXT

Ecclesiastes 3:1-15.  Willhite, Keith. “Live it Up!” JEHS 3:1, June 2003.

Isaiah 40:9.  Langley, Ken. “Bringing Good Tidings to Zion,”  JEHS 6:1, March 2006.

Jeremiah 1.  Edwards, J. Kent.  “The Place of the Preacher.”  JEHS 5:1, March 2005.

Matthew 11:25-30.  Johnson, Darrell W.  “The Main Thing.”   JEHS 4:1, March 2004.

Matthew 26:30-46.  Lee, Endel. “When Your Soul Quakes.” JEHS 2:2, December 2002.

Luke 17:1-17.  Chapell, Bryan. “To Make God Come Down.” JEHS 1:1 December 2001.

Acts 19:1-7.  Miller, Calvin. “Looking for The Holy Spirit in the Postmodern Sermon.” JEHS 2:1, June 2002.

2 Corinthians 2:14-17.  Anderson, Kenton C. “Preaching Stinks.”  JEHS 4:2, September 2004.

2 Corinthians 4:16-18.  Lutzer, Erwin. “Living Between Two Worlds.”  JEHS 3:2, December 2003.

1 Timothy 3:16.  Boreham, F.W. “The First Hymn.”  JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

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SERMON INDEX BY PREACHER/AUTHOR

Anderson, Kenton C. “Preaching Stinks” (sermon on 2 Corinthians 2:14-17).  JEHS 4:2, September 2004.

Boreham, F.W. “The First Hymn,” (sermon on 1 Timothy 3:16).  JEHS 5:2, September 2005.

Chapell, Bryan. “To Make God Come Down,” (sermon on Luke 17:1-17).  JEHS 1:1 December 2001.

Edwards, J. Kent.  “The Place of the Preacher,” (sermon on Jeremiah 1).  JEHS 5:1, March 2005.

Johnson, Darrell W.  “The Main Thing: Matthew 11:25-30,”  (sermon on Matthew 11:25-30). JEHS 4:1, March 2004.

Langley, Ken. “Bringing Good Tidings to Zion,” (sermon on Isaiah 40:9). JEHS 6:1, March 2006.

Lee, Endel. “When Your Soul Quakes,” (sermon on Matthew 26:30-46).  JEHS 2:2, December 2002.

Lutzer, Erwin. “Living Between Two Worlds: II Corinthians 4:16-18,” (sermon on 2 Corinthians 4:16-18).  JEHS 3:2, December 2003.

Miller, Calvin. “Looking for The Holy Spirit in the Postmodern Sermon,” (sermon on Acts 19:1-7).  JEHS 2:1, June 2002.

Willhite, Keith. “Live it Up!” (sermon on Ecclesiastes 3:1-15).   JEHS 3:1, June 2003.